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Tahrir Square two years on

Inspired by the Tunisian revolution, several thousand Egyptian protesters took to the streets to vent their anger at the country's brutal authorities on January 25, 2011. <br>
The demonstrations were a breakthrough for Egypt, a police state at the time. (Photo credit: AFP) On January 28, violent clashes erupted between police and protesters defying the ban on demonstrations, <br>
as seen on this picture taken near Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo credit: AFP) At nightfall, protesters interacted with the army, sent in to take over from police and restore order. <br>
(Photo credit: Adel Gastel)
Protesters set fire to the headquarters of the NDP (National Democratic Party), the party who held power for several decades. <br>
(Photo credit: Marc Daou)
 Demonstrators in Tahrir Square and surrounding area chatting with the army.<br>
(Photo credit: Marc Daou)
Some protesters, preparing for a prolonged occupation of Tahrir Square, caught up during their sleep <br>
on tanks stationed near the Museum of Cairo. (Photo credit: Mehdi Chebil)
 At night, demonstrators slept on the ground in Tahrir Square. Others spent their time trying <br>
to make money, such as this Egyptian flag vendor. (Photo credit: Marc Daou)
On February 1st, a massive demonstration was organised to protest against the regime, with the slogan ‘The people want the fall of the Rais <br>[President Hosni Mubarak]’. Nearly one million protesters flooded Tahrir Square, according to estimates by organisers. (Photo credit: Adel Gastel) Protesters gathered under the watchful eye of the Egyptian army. <br>
(Photo credit: Marc Daou)
Even children were out, some of them proudly displaying their political convictions.<br>
(Photo credit: Adel Gastel) Some Egyptian women also participated in the protest.<br>
(Photo credit: Marc Daou) Nevertheless, the authorities standing guard over Tahrir Square were not yet ready to relinquish control.<br>
(Photo credit: Adel Gastel)
The following day, on February 2, Mubarak's supporters planned to put an end to the Tahrir ‘masquerade’.<br>
(Photo credit: Mehdi Chebil) Mubarak's supporters arrived in hordes, clashing with opponents of the regime as the army stood by, <br>
reluctant to intervene. (Photo credit: Mehdi Chebil) The two sides faced off late in the evening. Rocks, sticks, Molotov cocktails, and even camels <br>
were used by Mubarak's supporters in an attempt to drive protesters away out of Tahrir Square. 
(Photo credit: Mehdi Chebil) The two sides faced off late in the evening. Rocks, sticks, Molotov cocktails, and even camels <br>
were used by Mubarak's supporters in an attempt to drive protesters away out of Tahrir Square. 
(Photo credit: Mehdi Chebil)
But those efforts were in vain. The next day, barricades erected by anti-Mubarak protesters were still standing.<br>
(Photo credit: Marc Daou)  The revolution withstood the crackdown, despite an official death toll of 850, as well as thousands injured. <br>
Mubarak stepped down several days later, on February 11, 2011. Tahrir Square erupted in joy, amid cries of ‘Get out!’. 
(Photo credit: Marc Daou)
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